Leica C (Typ 112) Harbor in a Frame

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by dalethorn, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    f4.9, 1/200 handheld, ISO 80. I've shot this harbor a hundred times, but today I "saw" this frame (3/4 of it actually) made by the concrete supports around a small rain shelter overlooking the harbor, so I thought the "frame" could be part of the image and possibly printed just as seen here.

    Charleston_Harbor05_s.
     
  2. Brian

    Brian Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Apr 3, 2013
    Very nice- which carrier is that?
     
  3. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    That's the Yorktown, a WWII carrier which now sits in Charleston Harbor (since 1980). It's in need of 100 million dollars or so for repairs, and I don't know what the current plans are to rescue it. Several months ago an NBA game between 2 top teams was scheduled on the deck and everyone arrived and was ready to go, even the Goodyear blimp, and then it was canceled because a moisture developed on the deck that couldn't be removed by game time. It was a deja vu in some respects, me being originally from Akron and LeBron there (also from Akron) and the Goodyear blimp (ditto). The ship is great to explore since it's so large, and you can get well above the top deck and see quite a ways around. Next to it is an old submarine, also I think from WWII, which I wouldn't recommend in the Summer, but it's fascinating to explore in cooler weather. People can also catch a ferry from there to Fort Sumter.
     
  4. Brian

    Brian Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Apr 3, 2013
    We were on it a couple of years ago- and aboard the Submarine.

    The visit to the submarine led to a 60 year postscript to one of my Dad's WW-Ii stories. Dad was in B-29's, went through a few of them. Dad's B-29 was shot up over Osaka, had 2 engines shot out from flak, and a 3rd one damaged. Third one gave out, the plane had 30 minutes or so before ditching into the Pacific. Dad was the radio operator/Gunner onboard, and was able to make contact with the USS Sunfish, a submarine on search and rescue. Plane ditched, crew got into a raft, Dad had to go back to the sinking plane to get the tail-gunner. The Sunfish picked them up. Not long after, the crew heard that the Sunfish was lost at sea. Always made Dad sad. So- the postscript, I looked for the name of the Sunfish on the plaque onboard the Clamagore for subs lost in the War. The "Sunfish" was not on it. Googled it- the Sunfish was lost- as in damaged and the radio inoperative- but made it back to safety after the war ended. Dad never heard that part.
     
  5. dalethorn

    dalethorn Guest

    That's an amazing story Brian - the great war produced some spectacular things, good and bad - it was great to hear about one of the good things.
     
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  6. asiafish

    asiafish Leica Place All-Pro

    Aug 9, 2013
    Bakersfield, CA
    Andrew
    Wrong war, though the Great War (1914-1918) has many fascinating submarine stories of its own. In fact the primary German U-Boat design at the beginning of WWII was essentially the same as the last U-Boat design of the Great War, only with better batteries. Early U-Boats actually burned kerosene.
     
  7. Brian

    Brian Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Apr 3, 2013
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